• Users Online: 128
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 
Table of Contents
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 55

A rare case of isolated retro-orbital fungal granuloma


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication24-Apr-2019

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, P.O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JHNP.JHNP_16_18

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. A rare case of isolated retro-orbital fungal granuloma. Int J Head Neck Pathol 2018;1:55

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. A rare case of isolated retro-orbital fungal granuloma. Int J Head Neck Pathol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Jul 20];1:55. Available from: http://www.ijhnp.org/text.asp?2018/1/2/55/257040



Sir,

I read with great interest the case report by Kaipuzha et al.[1] published in the January–June 2018 issue of the International Journal of Head and Neck Pathology. The authors described the clinical picture, diagnostic protocol, and treatment plan of the isolated retro-orbital fungal granuloma caused by Aspergillus versicolor in an Indian patient.[1] I assume that the rare development of that fungal granuloma at an unusual site must alert the authors to consider the underlying jeopardized immunity in the studied patient. Among jeopardized immune states needed to be considered, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has the leading priority. My assumption is based on the following point. It is explicit that due to low immunity, individuals infected with HIV are more susceptible to various bacterial, fungal, and parasitic infections compared to the individuals with the healthy immune system. Among fungal infections, aspergillosis has been reported in HIV-infected patients.[2] Studying fungal infections in India showed that 34% of infections were cryptococcosis and 16% of cases were aspergillosis.[3] Interestingly, 28% of cases were immunocompetent, and 72% were immunocompromised.[3] India is facing the distressing health hazard of HIV infection. The published data pointed out to 0.26% HIV seroprevalence compared with a global average of 0.2%.[4] I assume that defining the HIV status in the studied patient through the diagnostic workup of blood CD4 lymphocyte count and viral overload estimations was solicited. If that workup was to disclose HIV positivity, the case in question could truly expand the spectrum of HIV-associated aspergillosis rarely reported in the Indian literature.[5]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kaipuzha RR, Pulimoottil DT, Bakshi SS, Gopalakrishnan S. A rare case of isolated retro-orbital fungal granuloma. Int J Head Neck Pathol 2018;1:28-30.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Humphrey JM, Walsh TJ, Gulick RM. Invasive Aspergillus sinusitis in human immunodeficiency virus infection: Case report and review of the literature. Open Forum Infect Dis 2016;3:ofw135.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Sethi PK, Khanna L, Batra A, Anand I, Sethi NK, Torgovnick J, et al. Central nervous system fungal infections: Observations from a large tertiary hospital in Northern India. Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2012;114:1232-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Paranjape RS, Challacombe SJ. HIV/AIDS in India: An overview of the Indian epidemic. Oral Dis 2016;22 Suppl 1:10-4.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Kaur R, Mehra B, Dhakad MS, Goyal R, Bhalla P, Dewan R, et al. Fungal opportunistic pneumonias in HIV/AIDS patients: An Indian tertiary care experience. J Clin Diagn Res 2017;11:DC14-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed178    
    Printed30    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded33    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal